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Release
Nov 8, 2021

New in Dagster 0.13.0: Logging Improvements!

Logging without context, instance-wide handlers, capturing python logs, and more! Learn about the improvements we've made to Dagster logging since 0.12.0.
Owen Kephart
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Owen Kephart
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Release
Jul 19, 2021

Dagster 0.12.0: Into the Groove

In 0.12.0, we introduce pipeline failure sensors, solid-level retries, and more convenient testing APIs.
Owen Kephart
Name
Owen Kephart
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User Story
May 18, 2021

Incrementally Adopting Dagster at Mapbox

At Mapbox, we've adopted Dagster without breaking compatibility with our legacy Airflow systems -- and with huge gains to developer productivity.
Ben Pleasanton
Name
Ben Pleasanton
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Release
Apr 1, 2021

Dagster 0.11.0: Lucky Star

In 0.11.0, we introduce dynamic orchestration, a new backfill UI, and support for tracking asset lineage.
User Story
Mar 15, 2021

Building shared spaces for data teams at Drizly

Dagster lets a small data infrastructure team efficiently ship a data platform that supports users with different skillsets, letting anyone contribute with minimal coordination required.
Dennis Hume
Name
Dennis Hume
Handle
Community
Sep 15, 2020

Dagster Community Update: September 2020

Our monthly community meeting featured a retrospective of our 0.9.0 release, a preview of our 0.10.0 roadmap, and Prezi's journey from a homegrown orchestration solution to Dagster.
Release
Feb 26, 2020

Dagster 0.7.0: Waiting To Exhale

With 0.7.0 we set out improve the Dagster experience with large, production-scale pipelines, deployable to Kubernetes.
Release
Oct 10, 2019

Dagster 0.6.0: Impossible Princess

With 0.6.0, Dagster comes “batteries-included” — but still with pluggable options — for everything you need to execute, monitor, schedule, deploy, and debug your data applications.
Release
Jul 8, 2019

Introducing Dagster

Today the team at Elementl is proud to announce an early release of Dagster, an open-source library for building systems like ETL processes and ML pipelines. We believe they are, in reality, a single class of software system. We call them data applications.